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Mother Tries To Stop Her Twin Sons From Joining ISIS, They Hack Her To Death With Meat Cleavers

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Both studies on Butea Superba and its erectogenic effects appear to have their flaws, so although this herb could potentially be an erectogenic aid it is currently not proven to do so.

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Woman loses a THIRD of her body weight in 21 months thanks to this guide

A MUM has shed some serious pounds after over-indulging during her pregnancy.

Stay-at-home mum Amanda Keller grew up very skinny but never strong and in shape.

When she fell pregnant, the 22-year-old panicked about not gaining any weight during the first half of her pregnancy and ended up gorging on junk.

The youngster from Arizona, US, gained 3st 8lbs and hit her highest weight of 13st 6lbs and a UK dress size 14.

But her bulk caused health problems and Amanda ended up in hospital several times with high blood pressure and severe chest pains.

Fearing for her and her daughter's health, Amanda decided to make a change.

She found Kayla Itsines' Bikini Body Guide (BBG) online and began following her workout routine while ditching the junk food.

Amanda incredibly lost 4st 6lbs in just 21 months and landed on the slender weight of 9st.

She said: "I felt really sluggish and unhappy with my body. I wasn't happy with how the weight made me feel; physically and emotionally. I also had no energy.

"I decided to lose the weight because of two reasons; one – I just didn't like being overweight.

"I was a stay-at-home mum when I started working out and before I was working out, I was very depressed.

"Another reason was that I was constantly having severe chest pain for months.

"I went to the hospital several times and I had high blood pressure, but they could never figure out the chest pain."

Amanda continued: "I was really worried, since I had a young baby at the time, so I decided to try to become healthier to see if that would help – and it did.

"The chest pain went away after losing the weight.

"I'm so much more healthy now. I don't have chest pain anymore. It helped me get out of my slump of always being indoors and depressed.

"I have so much more energy to keep up with my daughter now."

Since being introduced to BBG – an eBook containing 12 weeks worth of 28-minute resistance workouts – all aspects of Amanda's health have improved.

She said: "I feel more positive about myself. I am proud of what I've accomplished. I've always liked playing sports a bit but I never liked running or workouts.

"I feel like I'm a much healthier person than I've ever been in my life.

"I'm much more positive and I feel as though I can get more done every day because of the energy it gives me."

But the most difficult part of her weight loss journey was overhauling her diet.

Amanda said: "I don't diet but I just try and remind myself when I go to grab an unhealthy snack to find healthy alternative instead.

"I didn't workout at all before, even before my pregnancy. I wasn't overweight before I got pregnant, but I was weak and had no muscle.

"I was very out of shape and would be out of breath from the simplest of activities. Now I workout three times a week and I can handle a lot more.

"I think the hardest part of losing weight is watching what you eat. It's hard to change unhealthy eating habits."

Now people flock to Amanda for her best diet and fitness tips.

She added: "A lot of people are surprised at how much I've lost and will ask me what I did in order to lose weight.

"My husband and friends are proud of me. I always tell people that my goal now is not to lose more weight, but to gain muscle. I am aiming to be strong, not skinny.

"Ease yourself into it and expect a few fall-backs. I gave up and started back up again several times. It's OK to take a week break if you feel like you need it.

"Do not be too hard on yourself. Also, to stay motivated, take progress photos. When I am not feeling motivated to workout, looking at my progress helps me get back in the mood to workout.

"I would also say drop all fizzy drinks, juices and alcohol. I only drink a cup of coffee in the morning and water for the rest of the day. I very rarely ever drink alcohol. We don't have fizzy drinks or juice in the house."

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What Does Fake Viagra Do To The Body? ‘World's Largest’ Counterfeit Viagra Plant Discovered

Polish police announced Wednesday an unprecedented raid of a factory that produced counterfeit pills for erectile dysfunction and steroids; the raid was a hard strike against counterfeit drug trafficking, a trade that hides on the internet and is often difficult to track or prosecute.

The factory, located in the northern city of Bydgoszcz, had a stockpile of over 100,000 Viagra-like pills and 43,000 vials of steroids when police stormed it, according to the AFP. Combined, the confiscated drugs were valued at over $4 million dollars, making for one of the biggest drug seizures of its kind. According to police spokeswoman Agnieszka Hamelusz, the products used for manufacturing the drugs originally came from China, but were shipped to the factory from other countries such as Greece, Great Britain, and Romania.

"It was the world's largest factory making anti-impotence drugs according to representatives of four companies whose products were counterfeited," Hamelusz told the AFP.

The counterfeit drug market has been booming, thanks largely to the advent of the internet. While a sliver of websites are licensed to legally sell prescription drugs, the vast majority of drugs purchased online come from illegal or barely regulated plants that produce drugs of varying quality. When it comes to Viagra (sildenafil citrate), a 2012 study found that 77 percent of online purchases of the drug from 22 different websites were counterfeit. There’s plenty of fake Viagra offline too — police recently raided a Jackson, Miss, convenience store that sold the pills as well as other illegal drugs.

Although many of these counterfeit pills aren’t necessarily less effective than their legit counterparts (at least according to a 2010 study), they’re absolutely more dangerous since the pills are often produced in unsanitary and unstandardized conditions. So not only can they be contaminated with foreign material or even other drugs, but the amount of active ingredient can dramatically vary from one individual pill to the other.

"Sometimes the match can be close enough that the counterfeit is reasonably good, other times due to a lack of medication or too much medication in the product or agents that have been added that shouldn't be in the product that are toxic, the patient could come to significant harm," Tommy Dolan, vice-president of Pfizer, the pharmaceutical company that actually produces Viagra, told the BBC earlier this May.

Earlier this April, 19 people on the West Coast were poisoned by counterfeit painkillers that were sold as the moderately strong prescription drug Norco but which actually contained the much more potent fentanyl. Though all soon recovered, though one woman was hospitalized after she became unresponsive and needed CPR.

The raid on the Bydgoszcz factory was the culmination of a long-spanning investigation by polish police, Hamelusz said. They had arrested several suspects over the course of 14 months, and a related raid of a house near the city uncovered secret rooms that contained machines worth over a million dollars. Millions of dollars worth of drugs were sold through the internet by the counterfeiters, police claimed.

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Arson as a weapon

The riots of 1929, which erupted over the Arabs' objection to changes in the arrangement for Jewish prayer at the Western Wall in Jerusalem, were one of the first serious outbreaks of violence among the Arab population of prestate Israel. A total of 133 Jews were murdered and hundreds more wounded. Dozens of Jewish communities were attacked and set on fire, some of them completely burned down. The most serious example was the ancient Jewish community of Hebron, where dozens of Jewish residents were slaughtered by their Arab neighbors.

These riots inspired the unforgettable poem by Emanuel Harusi, "Schav B'ni" ("Lie down, my son"), a poem about a young father worried about his little boy in the midst of the bloody events taking place around them. We cannot help but recall these lines from the poem: "The silo at Tel Yosef is burning / and smoke is also rising from Beit Alfa / But don't cry anymore now, rest and go to sleep / Night, night, a night of fire that will devour the harvest and the straw / We must not, must not despair / tomorrow we will begin again."

Arson was, and remains, part of the story of the Jewish-Arab struggle for Israel, going back to its earliest days. That was how it was in the 1929 riots, and that's how it was during the massive Arab revolt of the mid-1930s and during the more recent intifadas, especially the fire in the Carmel National Forest in the summer of 1989 and throughout the First Intifada.

The Palestinian war on Israel has seen ups and downs, as well as innovations, some of which turn out to be imitations of methods used in the past. Indeed, every time the Palestinian battle reaches an impasse and appears to be dying down, someone will always seek out and find new-old tactics. Sometimes, it's a calculated moved planned by the leaders of some group, and sometimes it's outbreaks of local, even spontaneous, violence.

The waves of terrorism 10 years ago showed what a disaster a lone terrorist carrying a bomb could create. After the Shin Bet security agency and the Israel Defense Forces found a solution to those waves of attacks, it was time for waves of stabbings or car ramming attacks, which we have seen for more than a year now. And once it appeared that those, too, were wearing thin, it was time to set fires.

We can assume that in the next few days, as long as the weather cooperates, the same lone actors -- some of whom are youths influenced by online incitement -- will try to imitate earlier arson attacks. The rain that is on its way will wash away the traces of the fire and bring this wave of attacks to an end, until next year.

This wave of attacks must be addressed mainly on the preventative level. It is inconceivable that a few lone terrorists, or even a single one, can set a fire that forces tens of thousands of Haifa residents to evacuate their homes. Past experience has taught us that sooner or later, we'll find a solution.

What should be of concern, other than the immediate efforts to capture the arsonists, is the push they're getting, mainly on social media, both from the Palestinian public and the Arab world. It's encouraging to see Egypt, Jordan and even the Palestinian Authority officially step up and help Israel battle the fires, but it's depressing to discover how much hatred toward Israel still simmers in the Arab world. These are the embers that must be stamped out to prevent the next fire.

The Palestinians have cause to worry, too. The regression nearly 100 years back to fires, and before that to stabbings -- mostly the work of lone individuals -- indicates that the Palestinians are going back to the starting point of the conflict, as if 100 years hadn't passed and the Palestinian national movement, which today oversees a government entity in Judea and Samaria, had never been founded. The Palestinian national movement is on the brink of collapse, having achieved nothing and reached a dead end. The actions of individuals when no path forward exists say it all.

But we can take comfort in the condemnations by individuals and by the Palestinian Authority, which, unlike Hamas, even sent teams of firefighters to help battle the blazes. This shows that even when no diplomatic solution is on the horizon, large parts of both peoples understand the need to live peacefully side by side, and even with each other.

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Bachelor, 37, has his PENIS trapped inside a wrench for 17 hours before being freed by dentists using a drill (because rescuers were unable to remove the tool)

A Chinese man had his penis freed from a tiny wrench last week after getting it stuck for nearly a day.

The 37-year-old, unnamed, was sent to hospital in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, after his trapped penis had swollen and turned purple.

Doctors and firefighters, who failed to free the man, had to call in dentists to help remove the wrench using a dental drill.

According to Huanqiu.com, an affiliation to People's Daily China, the man is a bachelor and lives in Linhai city.

He reportedly got his genitals trapped in the metal tool and was sent to the Taizhou Hospital at 9:30pm on June 2. It remains unclear why the man's penis had been stuck.

Doctors suggested that the man should undergo a surgical operation to reduce the blood flow in his penis before they could remove the tool.

It's said that the doctors tried to contact the man's parents to gain their approval for the surgery. His parents agreed to the operation, but failed to show up in the hospital to sign the consent.

As a result, the doctors had to call the Linhai Fire Brigade for help.

The firefighters arrived and brought an angle grinder.

However, the firefighters said they couldn't use the grinder. They explained that the heat generated from the grinder could pose danger to the patient.

One doctor suggested that they should find a dentist to help resolve the issue. The doctor said she had studied a similar case during a seminar.

Two dentists, Zhou Gi and Shi Gengsheng, were called. They arrived at the hospital half an hour after the man was sent in.

They brought a dental drill, a high-speed engine that rotates 200,000 to 300,000 times per minute.

'The dental engine also has a high-pressure water cooler to reduce the heat caused by the drilling,' said Zhou.

The rescue team tested the dental drill on a wrench from the firefighters' tool box before carrying out on the man.

The man was freed after a 30-minute operation by the two dentists. No further injuries were reported.

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Cytotoxic and Antimalarial β-Carboline Alkaloids from the Roots of Eurycoma longifolia

Abstract

Three new [n-pentyl β-carboline-1-propionate (1), 5-hydroxymethyl-9-methoxycanthin-6-one (2), and 1-hydroxy-9-methoxycanthin-6-one (3)] and 19 known β-carboline alkaloids were isolated from the roots of Eurycoma longifolia. The new structures were determined by comprehensive analyses of their 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectral data and by chemical transformation. These compounds were screened for in vitro cytotoxic and antimalarial activities, and 9-methoxycanthin-6-one (4) and canthin-6-one (5) demonstrated significant cytotoxicity against human lung cancer (A-549) and human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell lines.

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The perils of fake Viagra: £11million of the counterfeit pills, some containing arsenic, were seized last year as more and more men risk their lives because of sexual insecurity

After breaking up with his long-term partner, John Browne worried that returning to the dating scene would not be easy. But as the 36-year-old chef sat down for dinner with a young woman, he knew what he was feeling could not be dismissed as nerves.

His heart was beating too fast, his head was thumping and he was drenched in sweat. The father-of-two felt so ill that he feared he was having a cardiac arrest.

Worse, John thought the fact that he was feeling so wretched could be his own fault. Anticipating how the night might unfold, before leaving his home in Herefordshire he’d swallowed a small, blue, diamond-shaped pill.

He’d purchased the drug online, paying £25 for what the website claimed were ten Viagra pills. But far from having the desired effect, the pill had left him horribly ill. ‘Before I even got to the date, I started to feel really hot and sweaty,’ he said. ‘I thought it might be nerves — but then my heart started going really fast, I got a headache and felt a bit woozy.’

Unsurprisingly, the date did not go well, and by the time Mr Browne got home he was feeling so ill he considered heading to A&E. In the end, he just collapsed in bed.

‘I felt horrible for two days,’ he said. ‘I couldn’t sleep, my nose was blocked, I was dehydrated and I had red blotches all over my face.’ A quick internet search of what a real Viagra pill should look like confirmed that the ones he had purchased were fake.

‘I crushed them up and flushed them all down the toilet, because there was no way I was going to take them again,’ he said.

‘I only took them as a back-up. I’d never had any problems before, but I just wanted to be sure. I would never buy anything like that online again, and I wouldn’t recommend anyone else to do so either.’

And there are plenty of people who should take heed of his warning. Shocking new figures show the illegal market in fake or unlicensed erectile dysfunction pills has soared in the UK in recent years.

Officials have seized more than £11 million worth of these types of drugs in the past 12 months. That’s three times the value seized the year before, and a 15-fold increase on the £740,000 haul found in 2013.

The increased availability of such drugs via the internet makes getting hold of them much easier. Men like buying them online, rather than through their GP, because it spares their blushes.

There is also undoubtedly a growing demand. As well as those who have a medical condition for which Viagra or similar might be correctly prescribed, younger men are using them for sexual enhancement or are even taking them with other recreational drugs.

While Viagra costs up to £6 a tablet, fakes can be bought for as little as £1. Other similar pills are illegal, unlicensed generic erectile drugs from India, where they have been made in labs that would not meet British safety standards.

Analysis of these pills has found them to contain everything from gypsum (which is also used to make plaster of Paris) to printer ink, brick dust and even highly poisonous arsenic.

They are often manufactured by criminal gangs who have moved into the market in response to increased demand.

This demand is largely driven not by the elderly and infirm, but by many younger men who feel under pressure to perform — whatever the risks.

‘Unlicensed medicines can be dangerous, as they may contain incorrect ingredients and impurities,’ warns Alastair Jeffrey, head of enforcement at the Medicines And Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). ‘There is no way of knowing if they are manufactured to acceptable standards of quality and safety. Those involved in the illegal supply of medical products aren’t interested in your health — they are only interested in your money.’

Indeed, just how big the potential profits are was highlighted by the recent successful prosecution of a gang that was raking in up to £60,000 a week selling fake Viagra across Britain and beyond.

Described in court as a ‘highly organised, large-scale criminal enterprise’, the group set up a series of websites to sell fake pharmaceuticals.

They then created ‘front’ companies claiming to sell jewellery, fishing tackle and cosmetics to cover the electronic payments they duly received.

‘Offices were rented, stationery and packaging purchased, mail boxes rented to which customers posted cash, and merchant banking facilities were obtained to allow payments by debit cards,’ said prosecutor Gillian Jones. In total, around £10 million had been channelled through 100 bank accounts.

‘This was big business,’ Ms Jones said. ‘This case is not about wanting to distribute good medicines cheaply: the motivation was greed, with an utter disregard for patient safety.’

While those involved were ultimately jailed for up to six years each, what is concerning the authorities is that the trade in these illegal drugs is growing year after year.

In 2015, more than 90 per cent of all illegal unlicensed medication seized was for erectile problems, according to officials at the MHRA, much of this advertised via foreign-based internet sites.

Supplies were then shipped in bulk to individuals in the UK. Typically, these ‘drop shippers’, as they are known, are then responsible for their ultimate distribution.

‘The online site will get lots of orders, pinging the delivery addresses through to the person here, who will put them in the packages and send off as instructed,’ explained a source involved in ongoing operations against the illicit trade.

‘In that way, the person receiving it gets a parcel with a UK postmark on it — and they’ll think that because it has come from here, it is going to be OK, rather than if it came from, say, India.’

It also means that when the authorities succeed in closing down a particular website, a new one can be set up without altering the distribution chain.

Dating expert Hayley Quinn said that in her experience the use of Viagra-type substances among young professionals is not regarded as being out of the ordinary.

‘Either people are seeking to have a heightened or longer sexual experience, or perhaps they’re taking them to offset the effects of other drugs and alcohol,’ she said.

‘For men, particularly, I think there is a lot of pressure on performing, so when they have a new partner there will be a lot of anxiety. Even if the men do not actually need it, I think having something like that will often be seen as a crutch.’

That is very much the experience of 33-year-old Peter Jackson, who has been regularly using erectile dysfunction tablets for the past two years.

He purchases pills online from a company based in India. The pills are sold as Viagra and each one costs £1.

‘I started taking the pills after my marriage broke up,’ said the engineer, who lives in Gloucester. ‘We were married for nine years and I thought we were happy, but my wife walked out on me, taking the two children.

‘We had a normal, healthy sex life and I didn’t have any performance anxiety. Once I was single I started dating online, and I’ve discovered it is a whole new world out there.

‘I’m attracted to younger women in their 20s, but they have a much higher expectation of performance than my wife ever had.

‘Maybe it’s because they have more access to online porn, but they expect you to be far more active and inventive, and to be able to make love two or three times a night.

‘I work full-time and I just don’t have the energy. I had one totally disastrous date when I couldn’t perform, and the shame was intense. I had to pull my trousers on and slink home.’

He adds: ‘I wouldn’t be prescribed Viagra because I don’t have serious erectile dysfunction or a medical need — I’m a normal healthy young man in every other way.

‘But the first time I took one of these pills, the effect was instantaneous. I felt on top of the world — as if I could go all night.’

There were, however, deeply unpleasant side-effects — everything from severe headaches to fainting fits and dangerously high blood pressure.

‘I once collapsed after taking two pills in two days, and I was in a state of severe dehydration,’ he says. ‘I didn’t see a doctor, though, because I was too embarrassed. I just put myself to bed and waited to get better.

‘I know I shouldn’t still be taking the pills but I feel under such pressure to perform in bed that I have developed a dependence on them. I don’t think I could get an erection without them, and they mean I can perform for much longer. But goodness knows what they are doing to me.’

Indeed, the reason that Viagra is a prescription medicine is because it is not suitable for everyone and should only be taken with guidance from a medical professional.

Not only can it affect how other drugs work, but before prescribing it a doctor would want to know about any pre-existing medical conditions, such as kidney problems, low blood pressure, a heart attack or stroke.

But with fake pills, there is the added danger that it is impossible to know what the pill contains — whether that be the amount of active ingredient or the other fillers it will have been bulked out with.

It is also impossible to know in what type of conditions they were manufactured.

It is for all these reasons that experts warn against buying the drugs online—– advice that 31- year-old Leo Darwin has studiously ignored, despite suffering deeply unpleasant side-effects. He buys the pills for as little as £1 a go from a friend, who in turn orders them from abroad on the internet.

‘I’ve been using fake Viagra pills for a couple of years and I’ve had quite a few health scares with them,’ said the events manager from West Wickham in Kent.

‘After being given one packet by a friend, I had a fainting fit. My blood pressure soared and I was drenched with sweat. My vision also went blurry, and I could see things in a strange colour. I also get raging headaches.

‘I never should have started taking them, but the thing is that women these days seem to expect a star performance.

‘When I take fake Viagra, I can last about an hour.

‘Maybe it’s the proliferation of online porn, but a quickie these days just does not seem to count.

‘Sure, the side effects can be very worrying, but I’d still rather suffer that than the indignity of not being able to perform as well.’

A deeply worrying statement — but, no doubt, one that will be music to the ears of the unscrupulous gangs making a killing cashing in on society’s latest insecurity.

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A world of nose jobs and tummy tucks

Trends in cosmetic procedures may vary globally depending on ethnic preferences, but the fundamentals of health and beauty are universal

RACONTEUR

Some 20 million surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures were performed worldwide in 2014, according to latest figures from the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ISAPS) which has more than 2,700 certified surgeons in 95 countries. Not a huge surprise that it was women who committed to the knife, needle and beam, with ISAPS reporting more than 17 million cosmetic surgeries globally, representing 86.3 per cent of the total. For non-surgical cosmetic procedures, Botox was top of the list for both men and women.

So what is everyone having done? Breast augmentation has the highest global tally among women, with liposuction second and eyelid reduction (blepharoplasty) the most popular surgery for men.

Women are opting for ‘mummy makeovers’, where two or three cosmetic surgery procedures are performed in one operation

North America still leads the way with more than four million procedures carried out every year. An American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) 2014 survey showed 286,254 breast augmentations were performed. And 24.7 per cent of all Botox procedures in the world are in America.

Is the choice of procedures determined by geography? “What women and men are looking for in terms of cosmetic surgery does vary according to where they live,” says Martha McCully, an American beauty expert and founding beauty director of Allure magazine. “In New York City, youth-enhancing cosmetic surgery is popular. The standard is an eye lift performed in the doctor’s office, or neck or breast lift.” Ms McCully adds that there are “tribes” of different looks across the United States. “So if the look in Manhattan Beach, California, is to have perky but not large breasts, then there will be an awful lot of 40-somethings getting similar implants,” she says. “Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Malibu seem to show it off a little more than New Yorkers, in my opinion. On the Upper East Side of New York, if women don’t work but they want to maintain a look, they are going to the same surgeons for their eye lifts and breast lifts.”

On the other side of the world, there are a lot of people seeking non-surgical cosmetic solutions for sun damage and pigmentation problems, according to Shonagh Walker, a beauty journalist, based in Sydney. “Increasingly, women are opting for ‘mummy makeovers’, where two or three cosmetic surgery procedures are performed in one operation,” she says.

Globally we are now seeing the influence of new technologies and procedures, along with social and cultural influences, that have led to particular trends emerging. Iranians want rhinoplasty, Brazilians go for buttock enhancements, Germany has the most penile enlargement surgeries worldwide and in South Korea there is a trend to have a baby face combined with a womanly body (so-called bagel girls – baby faced and glamorous). And it is worth noting that more than a third of South Korean 20-somethings have had a cosmetic procedure of some sort.

Cosmetic surgery expert Wendy Lewis, who advises clients worldwide on cosmetic surgical and non-surgical procedures, says: “The internet is the great beauty equaliser for research, but ethnic traits are considered to be beautiful. In South Korea women look to reduce their cheekbones, using Botox to create a slimmer jaw line; in China women use Botox to reduce the circumference of their calves and in Japan nasal implants are still popular.”

UK consultant plastic surgeon Simon Withey adds: “Twenty years ago it seemed there was a strong tendency for patients to request ‘Westernisation’ of features. Now patients are much more likely to identify with someone with similar ethnicity, but whose features they prefer to their own.”

Consultant plastic surgeon and founder of London clinic Cadogan Cosmetics, Bryan Mayou, who performed the first liposuction procedure in the UK 32 years ago at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital, says he sees global patterns.

“There is a pattern and it changes not just on cultural grounds, but also on grounds of availability,” he says. “If a new procedure becomes available then people think they have a problem. For example, when it comes to using fillers in lips people didn’t realise they had small lips until there was a means of making them fuller.

“In terms of different nationalities, the Iranians in my view have splendid large, refined noses and look aristocratic, but many of them want a hump reduced. Middle Eastern men are more concerned now with their looks and want eyelifts, plus they tend to be pot-bellied and want liposuction.

“With my female Indian patients, the abdomen is bared in their clothing so that becomes a focus with many wanting liposuction. I see a lot of Russian girls who want bits of liposuction and breast surgery – many are newly divorced so they come in to get their confidence back. We also get a few Chinese clients who say they don’t trust Chinese surgeons.”

In terms of procedures worldwide, Brazil is second after the US. Buttock augmentation (gluteoplasty) is a national obsession and of the 319,960 procedures performed globally in 2013, 63,925 were by Brazilian surgeons, according to ISAPS. They even have a beauty contest called Miss BumBum and procedures are tax deductible based upon their ability to enhance mental and physical wellbeing. The public are intrigued by what their favourite star may or may not have had done

South Korea is ranked as having the highest number of cosmetic surgery procedures per capita globally. Double eyelid surgery (blepharoplasty) is popular to create bigger and wider eyes. Jaw reshaping and rhinoplasty is also sought after. Cosmetic surgery clinics in Seoul have names such as Small Face, Wannabe and Magic Nose.

Germany has perhaps the most surprising cosmetic surgery trend with ISAPS figures showing 2,786 penis enlargement treatments were performed in 2013, which was significantly more than in any other country. Venezuela was second with just 473 procedures.

Tehran is often cited as the world’s “nose job capital” and in 2014 Iran was among countries with the highest number of rhinoplasty procedures per capita globally. “Around 200,000 rhinoplasties are performed every year in Iran, with a view to create a dainty slightly up-turned tip,” says Sultan Hassan, medical director of Elite Surgical. “It is almost regarded as an indicator of elevated social status with documented accounts of patients wearing their nasal splints long after the week recommended.”

But recently state-run Iranian television announced it wouldn’t use actors in films and TV shows if it was obvious they had undergone cosmetic surgery. However, according to Mr Hassan: “The public are intrigued by what their favourite star may or may not have had done. There is a relation between socio-economic affluence and celebrity media awareness with demand for cosmetic surgery.”

Cosmetic surgery adviser Ms Lewis concludes that despite some regional variations, the basics of what is considered attractive do not differ that much globally. “Healthy, even toned skin is considered beautiful no matter where you live,” she says. “Plus, women everywhere are still bothered about carrying extra weight on their tummies, waist, hips and thighs. For men, it is always more about good hair and a slim waistline.

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Albanian court finds British paedophile guilty of sexual abuse

David Brown has been sentenced to 20 years in jail for abusing children in the orphanage he opened in Tirana seven years ago

The Guardian

A British paedophile who ran a Christian missionary orphanage for abandoned street children in Albania has been sentenced to 20 years in jail after being found guilty of sexually abusing children.

David Brown, 57, a charity worker from Edinburgh, opened the orphanage seven years ago, claiming to be receiving instructions from God. He was found guilty in Tirana's district court today of "sexual relations with minors".

When the Guardian recently interviewed him in prison, Brown denied ever abusing the boys at the "His Children" orphanage, a ramshackle and overcrowded home for Gypsy children in Tirana, Albania's capital.

"I came to Albania because I wanted to help the Albanian children," he said. "Everything that I set out to do has been violated. I was these children's father."

During his trial Brown accused two other British helpers at the home of committing the abuse. Dino Christodoulou, 45, a social therapy nurse from Blackburn in Lancashire, and Robin Arnold, 56, a salesman from Cromer in Norfolk were extradited to Albania in May and are being tried separately for their alleged role in the abuse.

Brown was arrested in May 2006, following a raid on the orphanage. Sentencing him to the maximum sentence in a high security jail in Albania, the judge said he hoped the punishment would serve as a warning to other paedophiles. He ordered Brown to be expelled from Albania when he is released from prison, in 2028.

Before travelling to Albania, Brown provided bible lessons and camping holidays to boys in Scotland over two decades.

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Why did the female orgasm evolve? ‘Because it feels good’

In [Richard Prum’s] new book, The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin’s Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World—And Us, Prum, an evolutionary ornithologist at Yale, challenges the dominant narrative among evolutionary biologists: that beauty and sexual ornaments, such as a peacock’s plumage, a deer’s antlers, or the size of a man’s penis, evolve for adaptive reasons. Traditional theory holds that these ornaments are designed to display good genes, attract females, and help the species reproduce. It also tends to characterize the female orgasm as either a tool for genetic subterfuge, or an evolutionary mistake.

Some evolutionary biologists theorized that [female orgasms] evolved to literally “upsuck” the sperm of genetically superior men….The other dominant theory…holds that the female orgasm, like male nipples, evolved as a byproduct of natural selection.

Prum posits a different—and coincidentally, far more appealing—explanation: that female sexual pleasure is in fact the central force behind the mating process. Basically, the female orgasm exists because it feels good, and women naturally sought out partners who could provide them with pleasurable feelings.

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