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Deadly fake Viagra: Online pharmacies suspected of selling counterfeit drugs

(CNN)"Buy real Viagra here, for a fraction of the price! Free Shipping included! All without a prescription!" shout the online headlines. A quick Google search brings up a plethora of enticing choices for any consumer looking for a deal on one of the world's most popular prescription medications.

Need beta blockers to bring down your blood pressure? Cholesterol lowering agents? Antibiotics? You name it, you can find it on the Internet. All the popular brand-name drugs are readily available online at discounted prices, and often without a valid prescription.

Many online retailers say they can cut through the red tape that ties up more traditional brick and mortar pharmacies and pass on a substantial savings to the customer in the process.

But before you pop that discounted capsule or tablet in your mouth, you might want to consider the real price of such pills. Chances are, if an Internet pharmacy deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

The World Health Organization estimates as many as 50% of illicit online pharmacies are selling counterfeit medications.

And in a 2014 annual report, the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy in the United States concluded after sampling more than 11,000 Internet pharmacies that a staggering 96% of those pharmacies did not comply with NABP patient safety and pharmacy practice standards, or state and federal laws, and were deemed by the NABP as "not recommended."

John Clark, former deputy assistant secretary for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency and now chief security officer and vice president of global security for Pfizer pharmaceuticals, explained that 78 counterfeit Pfizer medications have been found in 109 countries.

The most popular fake? Viagra.

Paint-filled antibiotics?

That heart medication being advertised at a fraction of the price might contain rat poison. The cholesterol lowering drug you are taking could be filled with brick dust. And the antibiotic may be filled with other toxic chemicals such as paint or inkjet material.

Clark said the agency found all these ingredients and more in counterfeit medications it seized, but believed the counterfeiters aren't necessarily looking to poison people. He said it's more about finding the cheapest binding agent they can get their hands on to maximize their profit.

The online sellers are clever, often advertising themselves as Canadian to ease the consumer's mind about the source of the drugs. But many of those websites are phony, and the drugs are coming from counterfeiters all over the world. The countries topping the counterfeit drug manufacturing list are India and China.

Speaking anonymously, with his face hidden, an online seller from Pakistan shared how easy it is to market counterfeit drugs. "We sell all over the world, to America, Europe, China, Iran and Iraq. All over. But we do not take these medications ourselves, nor do we recommend them to anyone we know, because they are not good quality medications."

A counterfeiter in a nearby Pakistani market proudly showed off his operation to CNN. As he picked up bottles and capsules waiting to be assembled, he said, "We prepare whatever is in high demand. But everything is the same, no matter what we call it. We put the very same ingredients in all of these capsules, and the very same syrup in all of these bottles. Only the color is different."

An illegal $431 billion a year industry

The profits are huge. In 2012, the WHO estimated the counterfeit drug trade was a $431 billion a year industry and growing. Since then, according to a report by the Intellectual Property Rights Coordination Center, the WHO no longer provides estimates of counterfeit drugs, "because of the difficulty of providing accurate measurement."

The practice is so widespread it is nearly impossible to track the depth and scope of the fake drug market.

Clark said part of the draw for counterfeiters is the "low risk and high reward. The profit margins are phenomenal, and the industry is highly lucrative. And if the counterfeiter is caught, he or she often receives the minimum sentence" which varies by country and can be as low as a fine and a few days in jail, Clark said.

Efforts to curb the trend

One of the main challenges of curbing the counterfeit trade is "a lack of universal laws that criminalize counterfeit medicine," he said. "Right now it is handled differently country by country."

"There needs to be global governance on this issue," he added.

Clark said Pfizer is assisting law enforcement in preventing counterfeit Pfizer medicines from reaching patients by providing training to authorities in 149 countries, including Pakistan.

There are other signs of progress. From 2010 to 2014, Interpol's Operation Pangea, with support from nations all over the globe, suspended 57,000 illicit online pharmacies and seized more than 30.3 million units of fake medications.

Pakistan, like many other countries, has created a special agency, the Drug Regulatory Authority of Pakistan, in an effort to crack down on the problem.

In the United States, the FDA says the 2013 Drug Supply Chain and Security Act, passed by Congress and signed into law by President Obama, "is being implemented over several years, and will require drug manufacturers, re-packagers, wholesale distributors and dispensers to provide product and transaction information with each sale and notify the FDA and other stakeholders of illegitimate products," the FDA said. "This will result in improved detection and removal of potentially dangerous drugs from the supply chain."

Despite these measures, the global counterfeit drug trade is a booming business. With each website that is shut down, with a few simple keystrokes the same seller can pop up again with a different URL.

With estimates of as many as 1 million people dying every year from ingesting counterfeit drugs, the reality remains a deadly one.

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Does Bangladesh have an age of consent?

March 11, 2017 - Dhaka Tribune

Logically, it should be the same as the minimum age for marriage

It’s an obvious question to ask.

But the fact few bother to do so, gives a far fuller answer than a legal textbook ever could.

Amid the many debates about Bangladesh’s new Child Marriage Restraint Act, it is telling how rarely commentators have mentioned the legal age at which an individual in Bangladesh is considered mature enough to consent to sex.

Even more so when you note that said age of consent, according to Bangladesh’s Penal Code, is only 14.

Given that alarms about the new child marriage law were first raised by health and human rights groups over three years ago, when earlier drafts proposed reducing the minimum marriage age for females down from 18 to 16, it is remarkable how much of the penal code’s contents pass without comment.

There is an obvious, albeit inexcusable, explanation for this state of affairs, of course: In Bangladesh, no matter what the law de jure says, the de facto reality, in practice, is that, neither age nor consent have much bearing on the matter. What counts most is marital status and not being single.

Sex before or without marriage is simply not regarded as a feasible option. That’s just the way it is (and/or we’d rather not talk about it).

Of course, you may know exceptions, but the word says it all, “exceptions.” Hence, the argument goes, there’s no point fretting about the seemingly low legal age of consent for sex outside marriage.

It’s the low average age of marriage generally, and high rate of illegal underage marriages that are (rightly) considered to be the bigger cause for concern.

Around half of all Bangladeshi girls are married off before the legal minimum age of 18 — most of the rest, within a few years after. With strong correlations between poverty, underage marriage, poor nutrition, and limited years in education, there are plenty of reasons to encourage older average marriage ages.

Unfortunately, this challenge has been made harder by the government responding to criticisms of its bill, by dropping its initial reference to 16 as a new minimum age. Instead, it has increased ambiguity by simply allowing for exceptions to the pre-existing minimum marriage ages (18 for female, 21 for males) to be permitted in fuzzily defined special circumstances.

The bigger point is the concept of consenting adults being free and able to decide private matters for themselves, that is what should be adopted and encouraged

Conceivably, such ambiguities could be resolved soon if the government acts on ministerial promises to provide further clarifications. But in the meantime, the soundbite from Girls not Brides that the new law risks Bangladesh reducing “minimum marriage age to zero” is being widely reported around the world.

It is long overdue for more people to take a more serious look at updating the 1860 Penal Code which applies in Bangladesh.

This is both easy and difficult.

Simple, because the whole code is not that many pages long, plus it’s instantly searchable on the government’s own website. And tricky, because some people would rather suffer, or see others suffer, from lack of information, than endure the risk of controversy or an embarrassing conversation.

Such caution and social convention is, sadly, both inevitable and ridiculous.

Ridiculous because Bangladesh would not have made the progress it has made in reducing average family sizes if we as a nation were simply too mortified to talk about sex and contraception. Including, and especially, the very young women and girls who are pressured into early and underage marriage having access to family-planning advice.

And inevitable because, look around you, patriarchy prevails and most people in the country tend to expect, or assume, everybody else wants them to abide by traditional expectations of sexual mores.

Sadly, this makes it easy for the few to intimidate the many. Take for instance the ongoing case of a development studies lecturer at Dhaka University being investigated because of an anonymous accusation of using “objectionable content” during a seemingly routine course about gender and development.

If such a case can arise from a DU post-graduate course, imagine the reactions a school-teacher would get from parents if they told their 15-year-old students that “the age of consent in Bangladesh is 14.”

Disbelief perhaps. But the fifth part of section 375 of the 1860 Penal Code is clear. It defines statutory rape as “with or without her consent, when she is under 14 years of age.”

From this arises the implication that the age of consent in Bangladesh is 14.

This same section also contains the egregious provision providing for marriage as a defence for rape, which is clearly long overdue for being repealed.

Both sections largely reflected the law in Britain at the same time. As it turned out, British parliamentarians very quickly got round to raising the age of consent in the UK to 16 after late Victorian press exposés of child trafficking in London brothels. But it took until 1991 for English law to make rape within marriage a crime in itself. Patriarchy is not just for Victorians then.

Incidentally, section 376 of the Penal Code does appear to imply an offence where the “wife” is under 12 years old, but whether this is sloppy ICS drafting or an intent to deal with the most serious forms of paedophilia is debatable.

More positively, perhaps, sections 372 and 373 are relatively detailed and specific about outlawing the trafficking of girls under 18 for prostitution.

Another marriage law, section 497, outlaws adultery but is presumably not used much partly because it excludes a wide range of possibilities where there may be “consent or connivance,” and mainly, I suspect, because it explicitly rules out punishing women — “the wife shall not be punished as an abettor.”

From this potted history alone, it is clear there is much to reform, but for now let’s stick to what should Bangladesh’s age of consent be. The main choice seems to be “keep as it is” or “raise it to 16” for the same reasons as Britain’s.

According to the internet worldwide chart: 14 is lower than the majority of other nations like France (15), Ireland (17), and India and Turkey (18). But 14 is not unusual as it is the same age as Austria, Brazil, China, and Germany. And higher than some countries like Japan (13), Philippines (12), and Nigeria (11).

The most common age of consent specified by most countries appears to be 16 years of age, as in the UK, US, Indonesia, Russia, and Malaysia.

Particularly in those Western jurisdictions, where there is wider public debate about sex, generally; and high profile exposure of child abuse scandals in religious bodies and children’s homes has increased public demands to protect children, these ages are sometimes strengthened by additional measures focused on stopping predatory adults, such as extra limitations on those far apart in age and/or in positions of authority.

Such scrutiny and attempts to improve the law are in marked contrast to a number of Muslim countries which either do not specify or enforce any minimum age for marriage and simply state that sex is only legal within marriage, and punishable without, as in Iran, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia.

Well that makes it simpler then: Don’t be like the latter. They have simply too many examples of arbitrary interpretations and misogynist abuses of religious scriptures to be taken seriously.

It’s no coincidence these nations have seen instances of rape victims being stoned to death and perpetrators excused with impunity.

It is the risk of going down the latter path that campaigners are warning against when they worry that “special circumstances” will see more young girls forced into marriage before 18.

This same section also contains the egregious provision providing for marriage as a defence for rape

True enough, but some of the rhetoric such as the law “will allow parents to force their daughters to marry their rapists” is still arguably alarmist. When Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina talked about allowing marriages to reduce social stigma, she was probably thinking more about consensual teenage pregnancies of the “shotgun wedding” variety, rather than victims of rape and predators.

No doubt her approach and interventions have included spin to appeal to social and religious conservatives, but it’s probable that she both believes this and trusts it to be electorally popular.

Provided the government is serious about it being an act to restrain underage marriage, with courts only permitting exceptions with good reasons, all is still not lost then.

Assuming ministers are able to recognise the main and easy to rectify flaw is not specifying an absolute minimum age.

Logically, such an absolute minimum age would have to be the same as the age of consent, which is why I asked this question in the first place. Going on numbers alone, if I had to pick one, I would say 16 is safer than 14.

But the bigger point is that the concept of consenting adults being free and able to decide private matters for themselves, is what should and needs to be adopted and encouraged. That won’t happen this month, but it has to be part of the way forward. Governments need to lead.

This isn’t about forcing people to change their personal moral attitudes and religious beliefs. It is about providing and protecting the freedom, health, and welfare of all the nation’s people.

Safeguarding children from predators, protecting the health of mothers, promoting safe sex, all these goals can be helped by improving the education, knowledge, and freedom of the entire population. And recognising that won’t happen without more widespread empowerment of women and girls.

All of which, including much of the progress Bangladesh has made in the past 40 years in improving life expectancy and child mortality rates, will be placed in jeopardy if the government does not do more to drastically reduce the scandalously high number of underage and early marriages.

With around half the population aged 19 or under, the economy growing and society changing fast, don’t expect the clamour aroused by these issues to damp down any time soon.

The least we can do for coming generations is to make sure they do not die from ignorance.

Niaz Alam is a member of the Editorial Board of Dhaka Tribune. A qualified lawyer, he has worked on corporate responsibility and ethical business issues since 1992. He sat on the Board of the London Pensions Fund Authority between 2001-2010 and is a former vice-chair of War on Want.

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Women were created from a bone of man. Or was that a boner?

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How to make your penis bigger: All the options

According to plastic surgeons, cosmetic procedures for men in the UK have risen 200 per cent in the last decade and demand for intimate procedures is unprecedented. Thanks to advances in cosmetic surgery, a range of cutting-edge injectables and implants mean that you can now be picture perfect for your next "belfie".

Scrotox

The latest plastic surgery takes vanity to a new, ballsy level. The nonsurgical plastic procedure is "scrotox", which is Botox shot into the scrotum. The procedure, which costs £400 to £650, takes a man's prunes and turns them into plums. So why do men get their "balls done"? Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr Randal Haworth believes there are three reasons.

First: "It keeps the balls from sweating," which is a big issues if you're an athlete.

Second: "It makes the balls look bigger."

And finally: "It gives the scrotum a more youthful look."

The Botox "relaxes" the wrinkles. They also "tighten up and move closer" to the body, giving the old boys a lift. With scrotox, you'll end up with the testes of a 12-year-old boy. The UK tends to be about three years behind the US in plastic surgery and scrotox is a relatively new procedure. Since it only lasts around four months, it's not yet as popular as other procedures. That said, the procedure is coming to the UK soon and is predicted to be big.

The Brazilian butt lift

The second most popular procedure for men - after pectoral implants - is the Brazilian Butt Lift (BBL). Who gets this procedure? We asked Dr Matthew Schulman, a surgeon in New York City, who performs many of them. "About 75 per cent of men requesting BBLs are gay and looking to increase the size and roundness of their buttocks," he says. "The other 25 per cent are straight men who complain that they have always had a flat butt." The results are permanent. "The advantage of this procedure is that it also includes liposuction as a way of harvesting donor fat. This allows for simultaneous contouring of the hip flanks and abdomen." Finally, a fat stomach that's good for something.

Dr Schulman also notes that it's a millennial phenomenon, with men aged between 20-35 requesting it the most. "The Kardashians have fuelled the increase in the procedure. Plus, Instagram has made us very conscious of how our body looks and there are plenty of photos of ideal butts." A reality show changed the beauty aesthetic of the United States and started a body modification trend that has trickled down to men. At a recent Hollywood party, the prevailing look for women was thin with a big derriere, stuffed into a tight dress.

For thin men with no body fat to harvest, Dr Schulman also provides silicone butt implants, but says they are riskier and can cause infection and shifting. And you can't sit down for three months until "the seeds are grown", as Dr Schulman explains. But at nearly £7,000 for each procedure, at least you'll have an ass like a Kardashian.

The P-shot

The P-shot or the Priapus shot was named after the Greek god of fertility. The shot was pioneered by Dr Charles Runels, an American MD who specialises in sexuality issues. The patient's blood is withdrawn, processed through a centrifuge to create platelet-rich plasma which contains growth factors. The process is used in sport medicine to rejuvenate torn ligaments. Dr Runels uses it to increase penis size by ten to 20 per cent and improve blood flow for a stronger, harder erection. Runels, the inventor of the Vampire Facelift says, "When I first started doing cosmetic procedures to sculpt the face, it occurred to me that it would be wonderful to do the same thing to the penis."

A study in the Journal Of Urology researching new therapies for erectile dysfunction found that "neovascularisation using vascular growth factors have been demonstrated to be feasible in animal models". So if you inject growth factors into a human penis, it'll grow new tissue and blood vessels and you will end up with a cock the size of a horse (probably).

In 2016, a gift certificate worth £1,375 was placed in the Oscar swag bags of nominees up for Best Actor In A Leading Role and Supporting Role, which included Michael Fassbender and Leonardo DiCaprio. "The 'penis rejuvenation' shot promises a bigger and firmer trouser trophy. It lasts 18 months, which gives time to be up for Best Erection In A Leading Role.

The penis implant

The equivalent of breast implants, the penis implant has finally popped up as a surgical option. Unlike the penile implant used for erectile dysfunction, this invention is for looks only. A silicone sheath wraps around the shaft to make it 2.5-4cm wider and longer. To be a candidate for the new penis implant, you can't have diabetes and can't be taking a blood thinner. And you have to be circumcised first, which is a great deal if you're Jewish.

The implant was invented in 2003, and since then only one doctor, Dr James Elist, a urologist and plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills, does the surgery. He has performed over 1,300 experimental operations, with what he says is a 95 per cent satisfaction rate. He is waiting for final FDA approval so he can license his product globally, so men around the world will go from having a small one to having a suitable-for-a-dick-pic one. If and when that happens, the penis implant will be the next big thing.

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Khmer Rouge terror in Cambodia

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'My body was burning': survivors recall horror of Isis mustard gas attack

When the artillery shells whistled overhead, Ahmed Latouf hid in his kitchen with his wife and children and waited for their impact. They thudded into the fields nearby, causing no damage – or so Latouf thought.

Twelve hours later, however, his skin started to bubble and weep. His wife was soon in worse shape, with giant blisters spreading across her shoulders and most of her body gripped by a burning rash. His four-day-old daughter was in an even worse condition, and is not expected to live.

The 21 August attack left as many as 25 people in the northern Syrian village of Marea contaminated by a substance that has since been confirmed as mustard gas, a chemical weapon banned under the 1925 Geneva protocol.

The gas was loaded into artillery shells and fired from about 8km away, from an area controlled by Islamic State. The attack marked the second time that Isis is believed to have used the outlawed substance and is being seen in the opposition-held north and in Turkey as a serious escalation in the civil war.

In late August Kurdish troops in neighbouring Iraq were also affected by mustard gas, a substance first used in the first world war, and sporadically in wars across the world in the century since.

Isis is thought to have fired 59 shells on Marea, a small village near the Turkish border town of Killis that stands between their current frontline and apparent goal of Azaa, a large border post 10 miles further west. The extremists have twice tried to storm Marea and been pushed back by rebel groups who chased them from the area 18 months ago.

Mustard gas attack in Marea

The rebels have resisted Isis attempts to return, bringing with them an increasing amount of heavy weapons, some looted from Iraq, others from Syrian bases, and yet more bought on a buoyant black market across the chaotic north.

Latouf, 31, his family and three more of the wounded from Marea were taken across the Turkish border into Gaziantep, where they are now being treated in hospitals.

“It happened at sunset,” he said from his hospital bed. “It smelt like garlic. At sunrise, my body was burning. I went to hospital and they took me straight to Turkey. My body was swollen, I had water bubbles all over it. Now it looks like I have second degree burns. I hope I can return to a normal life.

“The real problem is my daughter, she was four days old when the attack happened. She’s still in critical care. My wife is not as critical as our child.”

On the other side of Gaziantep, which has been a hub throughout the war for Syria’s war wounded and refugees who have escaped the fighting, a former general in the Syrian army’s chemical weapons division said he had received biological samples from the attack in Marea, which had been proven to be mustard gas.

“They were brought across the border and they have been checked,” said Zaher Saket, who fled his position in early 2012 after being ordered to use chemical weapons against demonstrators.

Since sarin was removed in 2013 following a UN resolution that aimed to avoid a US-led attack on the Syrian regime, there have been 126 cases of gas being used in Syria, and 125 of them were chlorine used by the regime, Saket claims.

“This is the first time that [mustard] gas has been used [in Syria]. It was artillery. I got a call from a [rebel] leader who sent me photos and asked me what the shells and substance they used were.

“I thought it was chlorine at the beginning, but after 12 hours, I got new photos from wounded children, and I understood then that it was mustard gas.

“When it comes close to food, clothes, or water it has no symptoms for 12 to 16 hours.

“I assume they [got it] from the regime, or Tehran, or [seized it] from the Iraqi military storage sites [that were raided by Isis last year].”

Jerry Smith, the former head of operations of the Organisation for the Prevention of Chemical Weapons/UN mission to Syria, said: “The photographs of the injuries and the unexploded projectile, along with the outline description of the events, are consistent with the characteristics and damaging properties of mustard chemical warfare agent.”

On Saturday, eight days after the attack, Turkey announced that it had sent its fighter jets to attack Isis sites in Syria. Turkish media, citing defence officials, said the attacks were the fourth against Isis in the month since Ankara launched a war against the Kurdish separatist group, the PKK, whose ally the YPG has been fighting ground battles against Isis in northern Syria.

Turkish jets are reported to have carried out more than 300 strikes against Kurdish targets in the same period.

The fighting, which has been supported by US fighter jets, has pushed the terror group back from the Turkish border. Kurdish militias are now in control of a stretch of the Turkish border from the Iraqi frontier until just east of Marea. And, in north-western Syria, they also control the border north of Idlib.

Isis is battling Syrian rebel units, among them jihadi groups, for control of the area between the Kurds. If they were to seize the border post, they would control a vital supply line into northern Syria.

US jets have been positioned since July in the Incirlik base, 30 minutes flying time from northern Syria, and have since launched an estimated 12 attacks against Isis targets around the Marea area.

Ankara’s invitation for the US to send jets to Incirlik came after more than a year of refusing requests from Washington. However, it has done little to convince US officials that both allies see the war through the same interests.

“The Kurds are our only real ally on the ground, and Turkey keeps attacking them,” said one senior western official. “We’re not yet able to reconcile that with our definition and the rest of the world’s definition of who the enemy is.”

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Kreutz Ideology analyses destruction differently. Social violence inherently benefits economic elites. The less peaceful a society, the less does social control restrict the liberties of the wealthy.

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How Mustard Gas Works

You jump to your feet at the slightest murmur of an attack. It's dark inside the bunker, and everywhere you look is blackness. Shells pound the ground no more than 50 meters in front of your position, rattling the fillings loose in your skull. Quickly you fumble in the darkness, looking for your rifle and helmet, but there's something odd about this attack. There's no explosion flash.

As you scramble to your position, the pounding stops and a low hissing fills the air, something you've never heard. Rifle in hand, you creep to the opening of your foxhole and peer out between two sandbags.

Your eyes begin to water as you try to focus on the scene in front of you. The clear, starry night fades as a creeping yellow fog slowly begins to consume your view.

To your left, soldiers in the bunker closest to the impact zones shout, "What's that smell?" You can make out a few hunched over at the waist, while several more frantically wave their hands in front of their faces.

The yellow fog creeps into your bunker, and you begin to lose your bearing. The sounds of men spitting and sneezing fill your ears. The air grows heavy, and the pungent garlic smell worsens. Panic sets in. You start to become dizzy from the heavy breathing, and your throat burns ever so slightly. You're in trouble.

Slowly the smell subsides, and the gas cloud dissipates. Everything around you swims into focus, and things settle down. Thankfully, you're breathing more easily and beginning to relax. You feel better now.

"No worries. It was just a smoke screen," you think.

You're alive, having just survived your first mustard gas attack. Little do you know the worst is yet to come.

This scenario is what the first soldiers who experienced a mustard gas attack in World War I might have gone through. In this article, we'll learn about mustard gas and its horrendous effects on soldiers and civilians during wartime. Read on and find out if you survived the gas attack, or what your fate might have been as we learn how mustard gas works.

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Feminists have been attacking politicians or opponents with buckets of excrements without any or minimal judiciary consequences. Let's turn this game around and dowse feminists with buckets of excrements. Let's see what happens.

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What Makes A Penis Attractive?

Mens Health

We look through hundreds of studies every week at Men’s Health, and we’re always impressed at some of the strange stuff scientists spend time and money researching.

For example, Swiss researchers wanted to explore whether women think guys with surgically corrected hyposadias—a birth defect in which your meatus, or urethral opening, is on the underside of your penis—have regular-looking rods.

As part of the study, the scientists asked female participants to rank which factors they considered most important in an attractive penis. File this under “requests that are only acceptable in a lab setting.”

Turns out women don’t love any particular penis trait. They rated overall genital appearance as the most important factor, followed by pubic hair.

Super precise characteristics like penile length, look of the scrotum, and position and shape of the meatus rounded out the least important qualities:

“Women perceive a wide variation of penile appearances as normal or good-looking,” says study author Norma Ruppen-Greeff, M.Sc.

Nothing mind-blowing, but here’s the nice thing about the results: While you might feel self-conscious about a schlong that comes up short or balls that hang a little low, women don’t focus on any one area when they judge your Johnson—they look at the total package.

So you just need to freshen up. You always look your best after a haircut, right? Researchers from Indiana University found that 75 percent of women say they would like their guy to trim down below.

Don’t risk jabbing this tender region with a sharp implement when a trimmer will breeze through your jungle safely. You want to maintain the area while preventing unsightly and uncomfortable razor burns. Aim to leave about an inch of hair – and don’t pretend you’ve never estimated length down there before.

Sprucing up your schlong can also make you feel sexier, boosting your confidence both in and out of the sack, the study says.

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It is the secret dream of every Swedish or German woman to marry a black men, or at least have sex with a black man. Every smart young African man should migrate to Europe. Free money, nice house, good sex!

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60 N.J. woman headed to prison for penis enlargement death

By Bill Wichert | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com November 10, 2015 at 8:14

NEWARK -- Before Kasia Rivera was sentenced on Monday to five years in state prison for conducting a fatal penis enlargement procedure in 2011, her attorney, Olubukola Adetula, said she has "accepted responsibity for her actions" and wanted to "move on with the rest of her life."

Essex County Assistant Prosecutor William Neafsey, however, said Rivera may want to move on with her life, but "we still have a man that died."

"A man died because of her recklessness," said Neafsey, adding that "she had no business sticking needles into anyone, specifically sticking a needle into a man's penis."

Rivera, 38, of East Orange, received the five-year prison term after having pleaded guilty on Sept. 8 to a reckless manslaughter charge in connection with the May 2011 death of Justin Street, 22, also of East Orange. Prosecutors recommended the five-year sentence under a plea deal.

Under the sentence handed down by Superior Court Judge John Zunic, Rivera must serve slightly more than four years before becoming eligible for parole. She will receive credit for nearly eight months of time served.

Rivera declined to make a statement during Monday's hearing.

In pleading guilty, Rivera admitted to injecting silicone into Street's penis when he visited her home on Glenwood Avenue in East Orange. The silicone was not the kind used in medical procedures, authorities said.

Authorities have said the injection shot directly into Street's bloodstream, shutting down his organs, and he died as a result the following day. A medical examiner later determined Street died from a silicone embolism, and his death was ruled a homicide, authorities said.

At the time of her guilty plea, Rivera acknowledged she was not trained as a medical doctor and she was neither trained nor licensed to administer the silicone injection.

Rivera, who had worked as a bartender in Irvington, could be deported to her native Jamaica as a result of her guilty plea, authorities said.

During Monday's hearing, Adetula noted how Rivera had been cooperative in the investigation. Adetula said Rivera surrendered to the police when she knew authorities were looking for her, and she provided a statement to detectives about her role in the incident.

Rivera had been preparing to go on trial in May, but the trial was postponed due to alleged jury tampering while jury selection was under way.

At that time, three jurors said they were approached on May 8 by a man associated with Rivera about influencing the outcome of the trial. Two of the jurors said they were offered bribes of $5,000.

One of those two jurors said he gave his phone number to the man and later received three calls from a woman whom he believed to be Rivera.

At a May 12 hearing, Superior Court Judge Ronald Wigler heard those allegations while interviewing 20 prospective jurors individually. The judge then dismissed all of the jurors from serving on the trial.

Wigler found Rivera was complicit in the attempt to improperly influence the potential jury, revoked her bail and remanded her to the Essex County Correctional Facility.

When she pleaded guilty on Sept. 8, Rivera said she did not participate in the alleged tampering scheme.

Rivera claimed the man, whom she described as a friend, had acted alone in approaching the jurors, and that she didn't ask him to approach the jurors or encourage him to do so.

While the case was still pending, Rivera also was charged in unrelated cases with possession of a stun gun and injecting silicone into another woman's buttocks and breasts up to four times. Under the plea agreement, the charges related to those cases have been dismissed.

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The age of explosives in warfare is as bygone as the age of swords and cavalries. The future of warfare is economic sabotage by arson and the redirection of population streams.

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‘Anesthesia Awareness:’ Waking Up During Surgery Can Have Long Lasting Psychological Affects February 15, 2017 11:41 PM

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Having surgery can be a frightening prospect, but imagine waking up during that surgery when you’re not supposed to.

As CBS2’s Kristine Johnson explained, it happens and the trauma can be life-changing if you find yourself awake under the knife.

“I heard yelling and screaming, and then the room became more real,” Jim Sabastian said.

“I could hear all these people panicking around me, but I must have been strapped to the table so I wouldn’t move,” David Pletzner said.

Those are terrified recollections from surgical patients.

“I saw the three lights of the operating room on me, and then the next thing, and then a lot of pain in my neck — were yanking on my head and pulling it back like this,” Sabastian said.

“Somebody said, ‘He’s awake,'” Pletzner added.

Sabastian and Pletzner both woke when they were supposed to be under anesthesia. It’s reported in about two of every 1,000 patients, but those who experience “anesthesia awareness: said it’s nothing short of traumatizing.

“The surgeon was freaking out with the anesthesiologist because he was running out of time,” Sabastian said.

Sabastian was having emergency surgery for a ruptured appendix.

Dr. Kiran Patel is an anesthesiologist who said anesthesia awareness has been associated with certain types of procedure.

“That would include cardiac surgery, high-risk Cesarean sections, or trauma,” Dr. Patel said.

It can leave doctors scrambling and patients in distress.

“We have to balance their safety and really honestly keeping them alive. We can’t give more anesthesia because their vital signs can’t support it,” Dr. Patel explained.

Pletzner has had multiple surgeries. He’s also had anesthesia awareness more than once.

“I woke up as they were either drilling or sawing my skull, and it was kind of like an out-of-body experience,” Pletzner said.

He said thankfully he didn’t feel anything then, though he wasn’t so lucky another time.

“I remember that like it was yesterday, because I could feel them with the needle in my finger,” he said.

Pletzner needed skin grafts on his hand, when he woke up during surgery this time, he said he remembers screaming from the pain.

“This was horrific,” he said.

“They’ll experience nightmares. They’ll experience flashbacks. This can also lead to depression,” Dr. Matthew Lorber said.

Dr. Matthew Lorber, a psychiatrist, said the experiences can also lead to post-traumatic stress disorder. Both Pletzner and Sabastian said they have moved on, but they dread any future procedures.

“Unless it’s absolutely life-threatening and completely necessary, I will not go for any surgery, not after that,” Sabastian said.

Whether you’re having a high risk procedure or just afraid you mat experience anesthesia awareness. Experts suggest discussing it with your doctor.

If it does happen, even having that conversation can reduce any potential trauma you may experience.

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